Topic ID #25779 - posted 12/21/2012 2:28 AM

Archaeologists Date World's Oldest Timber Constructions



Jennifer Palmer

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Archaeologists Date World's Oldest Timber Constructions

Dec. 20, 2012 — A research team led by Willy Tegel and Dr. Dietrich Hakelberg from the Institute of Forest Growth of the University of Freiburg has succeeded in precisely dating four water wells built by the first Central European agricultural civilization with the help of dendrochronology or growth ring dating. The wells were excavated at settlements in the Greater Leipzig region and are the oldest known timber constructions in the world. They were built by the Linear Pottery culture, which existed from roughly 5600 to 4900 BC.

The team's findings, which have been published in the international scientific journal PLoS ONE, afford new insight into prehistoric technology. The study was conducted by archaeologists and dendrochronologists from the Institute of Forest Growth in Freiburg, the Archaeological Heritage Office of Saxony in Dresden, and the Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL in Birmensdorf, Switzerland.

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Post ID#19904 - replied 12/24/2012 3:39 AM



Jennifer Palmer

Webmaster

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