Topic ID #28698 - posted 5/11/2013 3:20 AM

Baylor University researcher finds earliest evidence of human ancestors hunting & scavenging



Jennifer Palmer

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Baylor University researcher finds earliest evidence of human ancestors hunting & scavenging
               
WACO, Texas (May 9, 2013) -- A recent Baylor University research study has shed new light on the diet and food acquisition strategies of some the earliest human ancestors in Africa.

Beginning around two million years ago, early stone tool-making humans, known scientifically as Oldowan hominin, started to exhibit a number of physiological and ecological adaptations that required greater daily energy expenditures, including an increase in brain and body size, heavier investment in their offspring and significant home-range expansion. Demonstrating how these early humans acquired the extra energy they needed to sustain these shifts has been the subject of much debate among researchers.

A recent study led by Joseph Ferraro, Ph.D., assistant professor of anthropology at Baylor, offers new insight in this debate with a wealth of archaeological evidence from the two million-year-old site of Kanjera South (KJS), Kenya. The study's findings were recently published in PLOS One,
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0062174.

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