Post ID#20425 - replied 2/11/2014 4:16 AM



rkeyo

Moderator
Sweet!

Post ID#20426 - replied 2/11/2014 5:24 AM



Dwarmour

That is cool, I can't tell exactly but the blade looks like it has some retouch on the lateral margins of the ventral.  The uniface is sweet.  Is it showing some hafting wear?  Both look like they may have been expedient pieces though as they both seem to have been made from flake blanks with minor retouch and not more formalized pieces.

Post ID#20427 - replied 2/11/2014 12:26 PM



Charlie Hatchett

I agree with respect to the blade: denticulated along the lateral margins. I'm not sure if the flute-like notch on the left side was for hafting...? I believe the dark specimen is an endscraper:

http://www.ele.net/pes/pesintro.htm

http://www.ele.net/pes/discript.htm

http://www.ele.net/pes/lifecycl.htm

http://www.ele.net/pes/pes_wear.htm

http://www.ele.net/pes/pes_haft.htm

Post ID#20428 - replied 2/11/2014 12:36 PM



Charlie Hatchett

Post ID#20429 - replied 2/11/2014 1:22 PM



Dwarmour

oh sorry. . . charlie :-) ,  I was referring to the end scraper when i said uniface.  It looked like the elongated end coming off of the bit would have been hafted but it could have been just the angle its sitting on due to the flake scarring on the dorsal.  That segment on the left dorsal side of the blade just looks like a previous flake scar, but I could be wrong.

Post ID#20430 - replied 2/12/2014 5:07 AM



rkeyo

Moderator
The scraper appears to be more than just an expedient tool. The flake it's made on was appently chosen for its initial shape - round end with a flake scar down the back, adding strength, tapered, and flat. an interesting study would be to look at high magnification use wear/polishes and see if there is a correlation between use and scraper shape. There are a number of types/forms that recur, but what they were actually used for is rarely discussed in any detail. Make a great master's topic. BTW Charlie, nice clean hands and fingernails!

Post ID#20432 - replied 2/12/2014 6:52 PM



Charlie Hatchett

"...oh sorry. . . charlie :-) ..."

:-)~ 


"...I was referring to the end scraper when i said uniface.  It looked like the elongated end coming off of the bit would have been hafted but it could have been just the angle its sitting on due to the flake scarring on the dorsal.  That segment on the left dorsal side of the blade just looks like a previous flake scar, but I could be wrong..."

Yeah, it's pretty short (first distally pointed specimen). Guess it wouldn't have provided much area to aid in hafting. The similar, but more narrow, distally pointed blade below the original post has a longer "flute-like" scar. Seems that "could have" aided in hafting.

As far as I know these blades were knocked off prepared cores like these:

http://tinyurl.com/k85ckzp

Post ID#20433 - replied 2/12/2014 7:20 PM



Charlie Hatchett

BTW Charlie, nice clean hands and fingernails!

My wife does all the dirty work: I just take the images...and credit! ;-)


The scraper appears to be more than just an expedient tool. The flake it's made on was apparently chosen for its initial shape - round end with a flake scar down the back, adding strength, tapered, and flat. an interesting study would be to look at high magnification use wear/polishes and see if there is a correlation between use and scraper shape. There are a number of types/forms that recur, but what they were actually used for is rarely discussed in any detail. Make a great master's topic

True...true: Wide open for a juicy thesis.

In person there is longitudinally oriented macro wear visible on the distal end of the ventral face. If you blow up the image, some is apparent toward the right margin, right before the distal end of the ventral face begins to thin into a "stem".

Post ID#20453 - replied 3/12/2014 6:57 PM



unearth1979

Nice prehistoric blades,im sure the all are flat on 1 side,thoses my friends are alot older than Clovis ,im sure your wife is finding them on the west side of interstate 35 between salado and Austin area ,i go to srar ranch in florance,tx a pay dig ranch owned by craig hiles ,a great place to find big flint prehistoric blades and stone tools ,they used that area as a flint query back then,most would say there preforms are bifaces,no they where all used for something i promise ,native Americans then would occupie there camp ,and work all the prehistoric blades down to smaller prettier points ,no sharper though ,the prehistoric blades are very sharp had to be to cut threw the huge pray they cleaned ,lol back then they they didn't try to make pretty points to impress the woman

Post ID#20538 - replied 7/24/2014 11:31 AM



uniface

Nice stuff, Charlie.

I don't see the second one as an endsraper though. It may have been used as one on an ad hoc basis ("expedient tool" is a silly term -- it was expedient for them to do everything they ever did) but the distal end isn't thick enough to make a decent one ; it tapers down to a knife edge, in fact.

Looks like it's off a bipolar core . . . not missionary position Clovis strategy although further east, Middle & Late Paleo commonly used it.

FWIW (assuming anything).

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