Topic ID #32920 - posted 6/13/2014 1:52 PM

Yet another grad school question...



smb

Ah, yes, the same old question rears it's ugly head.

So, I want to go to grad school. My background is this: I earned my BA in 2012, and since then, I've been working a variety of small temporary positions--I'm on my 5th one already--of which 3 have been 100% archaeology-related (one excavation, one mostly lab and some excavation, and one some survey and some excavation), and 2 have been more interpretation positions. All told, I currently have 5 months of excavation experience (counting field school), but I'll have more by the end of the year assuming that this position I've just started holds up, and I have quite a bit of curation/lab experience. 

My question is NOT whether to pursue an MA in archaeology. I definitely want to do this. The idea of doing research and writing a thesis is actually exciting to me. I do NOT want an MA in GIS or geology or whatever; I've been reading these threads, and I've noticed that a lot of people suggest not getting an MA directly in archaeology, but I'm going to have to ignore this advice. I'm uninterested in getting an MA in any other field, and I feel that school is too expensive and life is too short to spend time earning an MA in something I don't care that much about. So my questions are really just these two:

1) Should I apply for grad school now, i.e. for entrance next year, or should I wait until I have a bit more practical experience as a field tech? 

2) Where are the best places to go? I currently live in California, and it would be great to go to school in this state, though I'm open to going elsewhere. I'm especially interested in historical archaeology, and especially the colonial periods--e.g. Spanish, English, and French colonization and contact with the Native Americans. Right now, I'm not really interested in a PhD. 

Thanks in advance for any replies! Any advice is greatly appreciated!




Post ID#20513 - replied 6/15/2014 4:57 PM



whatamIdoing

1) Might as well do it now, how much experience you have beforehand won't matter much these days; those two letters behind your name are what's needed for you to get a permit in most states and that's what matters. 

2) for historical archaeology check out http://www.sha.org
click on the grad school guide

(c)1996-2014, archaeologyfieldwork.com

Visit our Employment Network websites: archaeologyfieldwork.com - museumjobsonline.com - For information on advertising on this website, contact webmaster@archaeologyfieldwork.com