Topic ID #33475 - posted 8/29/2014 1:39 AM

Prehistoric migrations: DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic



Jennifer Palmer

Webmaster
Prehistoric migrations: DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic
Date:
August 28, 2014
Source:
University of Copenhagen

We know people have lived in the New World Arctic for about 5,000 years. Archaeological evidence clearly shows that a variety of cultures survived the harsh climate in Alaska, Canada and Greenland for thousands of years. Despite this, there are several unanswered questions about these people: Where did they come from? Did they come in several waves? When did they arrive? Who are their descendants? And who can call themselves the indigenous peoples of the Arctic? We can now answer some of these questions, thanks to a comprehensive DNA study of current and former inhabitants of Greenland, Arctic Canada, Alaska, the Aleutian Islands and Siberia, conducted by an international team headed by the Centre for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen.




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