Topic ID #37608 - posted 11/8/2016 2:39 AM

2017 ARCHAEOLOGICAL DIG IN THE SANCTUARY OF SA CUDIA CREMADA, MENORCA, SPAIN



SA CUDIA CREMADA FIELD SCHOOL

DIG IN A MONUMENTAL SANCTUARY FROM THE MEDITERRANEAN RECENT PREHISTORY

SESSIONS: 
Session #1: September 4th - 15th
Session #2: September 18th - 29th
 


In 2017 Sa Cudia Cremada Field School offers a course based on the excavation of a cyclopean sanctuary dating from the Iron Age period in the site of Sa Cudia Cremada, Menorca (Balearic Islands, Spain).

During the Iron Age Menorca was inhabited by an indigenous society known as the Talayotic, whose main characteristics were the cyclopean construction technique, hand-made pottery production, collective inhumation burials and a strong religiousness, as can be seen in their funerary world and their sanctuaries.

This culture, which had strong commercial relationships with the Punics, died out after the Roman conquest of the Balearic Islands in 123 BC.

The archaeological site of Sa Cudia Cremada, in the vicinity of the city of Mahón, is located in a farming property, where very well-preserved architectural, ethnological and archaeological elements blend in a unique Minorcan landscape. Even though all the area is archaeologically rich, the most distinctive part is formed by a talayotic settlement along with its necropolis. The most visible structures are three talayots (monumental tower-shaped structures) around which the rest of the structural remains are organized in the area.

The other distinguished structure in Sa Cudia Cremada is the sanctuary, where archaeological fieldwork run by the field school will take place. In 2015 we found the sanctuary's main monument: the Taula, which was located in situ towards the center of the building. Also we discover all the walls that form this building as well as several pilasters and its main entrance. Many materials were located too, including indigenous pottery, but also Punic, Iberian and Roman productions. In 2016 we continued reducing the archaeological levels,  including a tumble layer inside the building. 

The main aim of fieldwork is that of training students in the different tasks related to an archaeological excavation (digging, on-site drawing, sampling, etc). Fieldwork will be combined with lab work, lectures, workshops as well as excursions to discover the archaeology and natural environment of an island which was declared Reserve of the Biosphere by the UNESCO in 1993. 

General course structure: 

  1. Fieldwork: Participants will excavate in the sanctuary using modern field excavation methods and will be trained in:
  • The identification of archaeological remains and features.
  • Photographic documentation.
  • Drawing plans and sections.
  • The use of topographic instruments. 

b.Laboratory:

  • Processing of materials found on site (washing, labelling, etc.)
  • Drawing of archaeological materials.
  • Classification and inventory of materials.
  • Proper packaging of materials.

c. Workshops: 

To choose among several options including: digitizing archaeological drawings, photogrammetry, pottery restoration.

d. Field trips:

Every week a set of excursions will be designed in order to show students the most significant prehistoric remains of the islands as well as materials on display in the 2 archaeological museums located in Mahón and Ciutadella. 

COSTS: 

- Signing up for one session (two weeks): 790 Euro (tuition fees, materials, accommodation, medical insurance, daily transportation to/from the site, excursions, entrance to museums and archaeological sites, snack during school time, pick-up service at the airport upon arrival, workshops with specialists, certificate of participation). 

- Sign up for 2 sessions (4 weeks) and pay ONLY 1200 Euro.

CONTACT INFORMATION: 

sacudiafieldschool@gmail.com 

 






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