Topic ID #37728 - posted 12/1/2016 4:30 PM

Italy: Turin Museum of Egyptology Field School 2017 - Academic Credit through UCLA



ifrglobal



Project Overview


The collection of ancient Egyptian artifacts in the 
Museo Egizio in Turin (Italy) is among the most important in the world. It includes the Old Kingdom Tomb of the Unknown, the New Kingdom Tomb of Kha and Merit, the Nubian Temple of Ellesiya, and the Turin Papyrus Map. This field school aims to contribute to the analysis and publication of selected ceramic artifacts and ancient textiles, with a special focus on production techniques and communities of practice. Students will have opportunities to be actively involved in all aspects of the preservation, study and presentation of museum objects.

Program Director: Dr. Hans Barnard  
Course Dates: June 25-July 30, 2017
Application Deadline: Jun 23, 2017
Tuition: $4,900
Credit: 12 UCLA credit units 

Accommodations: In Turin, students and foreign project staff will stay in Cristina 52Cristina 52 is located in central Turin, within walking distance of the Museo Egizio. It is housed in the former Madama Garage, designed by the Valle brothers and opened in 1957 to coincide with the introduction of the iconic Fiat 500. Originally a multi-level parking structure combined with a car wash and repair shop, the building was completely renovated in 2006 and now comprises nine floors of modern apartments, all with fast internet and air conditioning, topped by a large sun roof with spectacular views over Turin and its surroundings. The building is kept clean and safe by a professional staff. Each room is shared by two students. Rooms have a basic pantry, allowing guests to prepare hot drinks and simple meals. Cristina52 provides its guests with a northern Italian-style breakfast, consisting of coffee and a croissant. On weekdays, lunch will be served in the museum cafeteria and dinner in one of the many restaurants between the museum and Cristina52. Lunch and dinner are considered part of the fieldschool and the presence of all students is compulsory. Students with special dietary needs should discuss these with the project directors before traveling to Italy. The tap water in Turin is potable and all stores and restaurants sell bottled water. In the weekends everyone is free to explore the many lunch and dining options available, alone or in small groups, or to prepare meals themselves. Turin is one of the centers of Italian cuisine and food is fresh and well prepared. Ample non-local options are also available, as are vegetarian and vegan food. It should be noted that dinner is typically served rather late in Turin, after 8pm, and is preceded—between 5pm and 7pm—by a light meal of aperitivo (comparable to Spanish tapas) that accompany drinks such as Aperol spritz, americano or negroni. The quality and amount of aperitivo differ greatly between bars and restaurants, some serving enough to be considered dinner, referred to as apericena.


For further information visit Program Page: http://ifrglobal.org/program/italy-turin-museum/





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