Topic ID #3901 - posted 7/17/2008 1:56 AM

Paglicci 23



Charlie Hatchett

Quote:

The Paglicci 23 individual carried a mtDNA sequence that is still
common in Europe, and which radically differs from those of the almost
contemporary Neandertals, demonstrating a genealogical continuity
across 28,000 years, from Cro-Magnoid to modern Europeans. Because all
potential sources of modern DNA contamination are known, the Paglicci
23 sample will offer a unique opportunity to get insight for the first
time into the nuclear genes of early modern Europeans.

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%
2Fjournal.pone.0002700;jsessionid=077D0107E5A3BEEEDDA4FF0DBF5B0543




Post ID#10018 - replied 7/17/2008 11:27 AM



Charlie Hatchett

Thanks for fixing the link, Jerry.

Post ID#10117 - replied 7/19/2008 6:02 AM



AMH

http://johnhawks.net/weblog/reviews/neandertals/neandertal_dna/caramelli-paglicci-23-mtdna-2008.html

Is there anything surprising about finding the Cambridge Reference Sequence in Paglicci 23?

I don't think it's surprising in the least. No European who has yet been sampled carries a mitochondrial DNA sequence that looks like any known Neandertal mtDNA sequence. The Neandertal sequences had to disappear from the European population sometime. The sequence diversity of modern mtDNA haplogroups in Europe suggests that several of them entered Europe during Upper Paleolithic times, although some entered later. Some Upper Paleolithic Europeans must have had sequences like some living Europeans, and the CRS is one of the most common.

Does that mean that all Upper Paleolithic Europeans carried sequences that are present in living Europeans? Now, this question cannot really be answered without an exhaustive sampling of Upper Paleolithic remains. The sampling of living Europeans has been pretty exhaustive, but not so complete as to rule out the presence of Neandertal mtDNA entirely.



John Hawks commenting on topic.

Post ID#10119 - replied 7/19/2008 9:46 AM



Charlie Hatchett

Paglicci 23

Re: Paglicci 23


--- In HumanMigrations@yahoogroups.com, "Gisele Horvat" <g> wrote:
>
> --- In HumanMigrations@yahoogroups.com, "preclovis250k"
> <charliehatchett> wrote:
> [...]
> > Man I have a hard time keeping the sequences straight. Is
> > it possible the Paglicci 23 researchers could account
> > for a significant portion of the Paglicci 23 sequences?
> > All of them?
>
> It is my opinion that some of the clones were contaminated
> (B.1.2 & B.1.8) but I can't speak for the rest.
>
> Gisele
>


--- In HumanMigrations@yahoogroups.com, "Gisele Horvat" <g> wrote:
>
> --- In HumanMigrations@yahoogroups.com, "preclovis250k"
> <charliehatchett> wrote:
>
> > A 28,000 Years Old Cro-Magnon mtDNA Sequence Differs from
> > All Potentially Contaminating Modern Sequences
>
> I think it would be more correct to say "slightly differs"
> as the difference could be as little as one mutation in 360
> nucleotide sites.
>
> Gisele

Gotcha. Are any the Paglicci 23 mutations derived from HV or are all
preHV/ Group Ro and older?

If derived from HV, then what do you make of Brandstaetter et al.
statement:

"…Given an estimated coalescence time of the distinct lineages of 10 -
18 kya, the differences in the distributions could hint to either
limited maternal gene flow after the last glacial maximum due to the
alpine nature of the regions involved or to a stochastic loss of
diversity due to environmental events and/or disease episodes
occurred at different times and in distinctive regions…"

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/8/191

Charlie


http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/HumanMigrations/message/3224

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