Topic ID #9695 - posted 3/5/2011 3:05 PM

DNA tests on bone fragment inconclusive in Amelia Earhart search



Jennifer Palmer

Webmaster
DNA tests on bone fragment inconclusive in Amelia Earhart search
March 03, 2011|By Phil Gast, CNN

The fate of famed aviator Amelia Earhart remains a mystery after DNA tests on one of three bone fragments discovered on a Pacific island proved inconclusive.

Cecil M. Lewis Jr. of the University of Oklahoma's Molecular Anthropology Laboratories reported "the question of whether the bone is human must remain unanswered" until new technologies may make a determination possible.

The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) asked Lewis to test the bones found in 2010 on Nikumaroro, formerly Gardner Island. The bone tested by Lewis may be from Earhart's finger, the group says.


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Post ID#18567 - replied 3/6/2011 12:51 PM



marehart


Unfortunate that her voyage ended so badly.  She was truly a pioneer in aviation. 

What is not generally known is that oddly enough she had a very stubborn streak about non-aircraft related new technology.  She especially had hostility for radio.  She learned the basics, but adamantly refused to learn tuning or direction finding.  At the time, navigators went by compass/speed/wind. Her navigator, Fred Noonen was about as learned on the radia as she; but that's not saying much.

Sadly, being able to tune a radio and using it to determine her location is what likely led to the aircraft running out of fuel. One oddity, among many ironies, is that the search did not include this island.  It was on the maps, but was deemed that since she was such a brilliant pilot, she just couldn't have been that far off!

Her voyage is reminiscsant of what early (legal) migrants to North America as they crossed Beringia and into the interior.  If their truly seat of the pants navigation was off and they went down the proverbial wrong path, they too could possibly starve to death (reminds one of the movie Ice Man (I think)).

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